HOME

OUR DOCTORS

ORTHOPEDIC SERVICES

APPOINTMENT REQUEST

 
 
 

HIP REPLACEMENT SURGERY

 

TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

HIP SURFACE REPLACEMENT

HIP ARTHROSCOPY

HIP REPLACEMENT FAQ

PREPARING FOR HIP SURGERY

AFTER YOUR HIP SURGERY

WOMEN AND HIP REPLACEMENT

HIP REPLACEMENT RECOVERY

CORE DECOMPRESSION

OSTEOTOMY

 

HIP CONDITIONS

 

ARTHRITIS OF THE HIP

OSTEOARTHRITIS

RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

HIP DYSPLASIA

HIP IMPINGEMENT

TENDONITIS OF THE HIP

AVASCULAR NECROSIS

OSTEONECROSIS OF THE HIP

OSTEOPOROSIS OF THE HIP

 

HIP INJURIES

 

HIP FRACTURES

MUSCLE STRAINS & SPRAINS

HIP FRACTURES & DISLOCATIONS

 

PATIENT RESOURCES

 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGEONS

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR SURGEON

ANATOMY OF THE HIP

ORTHOPEDIC EVALUATIONS

ORTHOPEDIC GLOSSARY

TREATMENT OPTIONS

HIP PAIN CAUSES
Insurance Carriers

 

 

 

Anatomy of The Hip

The hip is one of the largest weight-bearing joints in the body. When it's working properly, it lets you walk, sit, bend, and turn without pain. To keep it moving smoothly, a complex network of bones, cartilage, muscles, ligaments, and tendons must all work in harmony.

The hip is a very stable ball-and-socket joint: A ball (femoral head) at the top of the thighbone (femur) fits into a rounded socket or cup-like cavity (acetabulum) in your pelvis. Bands of tissues called ligaments form a capsule connecting the ball to the socket and holding the bones in place.

A layer of smooth tissue called cartilage cushions the surface of the bones, helping the ball to rotate easily in the socket. Fluid-filled sacs (bursae) cushion the area where muscles or tendons glide across bone. The capsule surrounding the joint also has a lining (synovium) that secretes a clear liquid called synovial fluid. This fluid lubricates the joint, further reducing friction and making movement easier.

How The Hip Works

The hip is one of the body's largest weight-bearing joints. It consists of two main parts: a ball (femoral head) at the top of your thighbone (femur) that fits into a rounded socket (acetabulum) in your pelvis. Bands of tissue called ligaments (hip capsule) connect the ball to the socket and provide stability to the joint.

The bone surfaces of the ball and socket have a smooth durable cover of articular cartilage that cushions the ends of the bones and enables them to move easily.

A thin, smooth tissue called synovial membrane covers all remaining surfaces of the hip joint. In a healthy hip, this membrane makes a small amount of fluid that lubricates and almost eliminates friction in your hip joint.

Normally, all of these parts of your hip work in harmony, allowing you to move easily and without pain.

 

 

 

 

   

Privacy Policies     l     Disclaimer

Copyright 2011. All Rights Reserved.

United Hip Specialists